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3 reasons why keeping fit is important as you get older


Whether you were a keen sports person or casual weekend walker in your earlier years, it’s no hiding the truth; our bodies need a little bit of extra love and attention in order to stay fit and healthy as we get older. However, rather than hit the gym (with all those Gen Z gym-junkies) getting older offers a range of new opportunities to get out, be active and have a bit of fun.

Whether it’s spending some time on the tennis court, catching up with a few friends at bowls or walking the fairway of the local golf club, you’d be surprised how a little bit of regular exercise can contribute to your overall wellbeing in more than just a physical way.

Regular Sport Helps to Keep You Socially Active

One of the most underestimated benefits to regular exercise is the social interactivity it presents. An active body is only as good as an active mind and with retirement comes the breaking of long-lasting familiar routines such as work, of which social interactivity is a major focus.

You may feel free to do whatever you want in retirement but it can be easy to spend more time at home in isolation, especially when mobility is decreased and online social platforms are more-so becoming the norm to staying in touch. By establishing regular get-togethers on the tennis court or the routine mid-week golf game we not only have more reason to catch up with friends but it presents an opportunity to create a new routine and a great way to establish new friendships.

 

Regular Sport Keeps You Physically Active

From heart disease to diabetes, there is no denying that what were once small aches and pains may manifest to more serious chronic conditions. That’s the science of it, and that’s why regular sport and exercise is important in helping prolong the symptoms, meaning less trips for you to the doctor.

Regular exercise is central to how you can help prevent longer term injuries to the body. Activities such as walking can help increase your heart rate, which can mean a decreased risk of cardiovascular conditions and obesity. The Australian Government Department Of Health states that even aiming for 30 minutes of increased heart-rate each day, five days a week can drastically improve your health.

Osteoporosis, which causes fragile bones is also a common implication of ageing. Whilst medication can help fight symptoms, moderate-resistance activities like stairs, cross-trainers and even gardening can help build bone density, preventing fractures and reducing the rate of natural bone loss later in life.

Regular Sport Gives You A Purpose

Last but not least, regular exercise and sport can help create a purpose as you head into retirement. As you say goodbye to important milestones such as having a successful career, paying off that mortgage or creating a family, heading into retirement may lead to many restless thoughts about the future.

By joining sports groups, or participating in regular exercise you can develop new personal goals to aim for and give you a weekly purpose. Much like a hobby allows a creative outlet or personal passionate, joining a sporting team can give this same purposeful effect, with a shared common goal and ambition to aim for each week, month or year.

So, whether you are the social butterfly, are looking to break a sweat, or simply need a new purpose, sport is a great way to get involved and stay social active and healthy as you get set and go into retirement.

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