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Staying safe in the heat this summer

health
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As the days become hotter and the mercury starts to rise, the heat-related health risks are also more likely to be on the increase. So, how can you keep your house cool and have a chilled-out summer?

1. Even without air-conditioning, there are ways to maintain a cool home. One is to work out which are the coolest rooms, and then keep them that way by drawing blinds and curtains early, before the sun streams in. Closing off rooms that are already cool protects them from rising temperatures in other areas.

2. Strenuous or outdoor jobs, such as watering the garden, shopping or daily exercise, are best done early. Mowing the lawn or washing the car can wait for another day.

3. An already hot kitchen doesn't need an extra blast from the oven or cooktop – hot meals are for cooler days. Salads, sandwiches and fruit are great, as they can be prepared ahead and eaten straight from the fridge. Large meals can weigh you down, so consider having several snacks which are more easily digested.

4. A very hot day is the perfect excuse to spend an afternoon reading or watching a boxed-set of DVDs, especially if the TV can be moved into a cooler room. Otherwise, free-view content can be accessed on a laptop or tablet.

5. Water is everyone's best friend – when it's hot – and taking small drinks frequently is better than gulping down too much in one hit.

6. When the heat starts to rise, a great way to stay cool is to keep several icy cold cloths in the freezer and use on pressure points, such as neck and wrists.

7. It's amazing how refreshing a swim can be. Even just sitting looking at water has a cooling effect. Many public pools offer shade these days; whereas use an umbrella when on the beach. In either scenario, sunscreen is the first thing to be packed – and used!

8. Air-conditioning doesn't have to be icy cold. Even when set at 24 degrees, it will keep the body cool without being a drain on your electricity.

This article was supplied by Australia's leading retirement website YourLifeChoices

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